Mrs. Hubbard

Hickory, dickory, dock,
The mouse ran up the clock.
The clock struck one,
The mouse ran down,
Hickory, dickory, dock


That's the first reference to Mrs. Nicolettis throwing a temper tantrum, whereupon Mrs. Hubbard, sister to Ms. Lemon,  smoothed Mrs. N's ruffled feathers and finished by saying, "I shouldn't think about it if I were you".

Easy for you to say, Mrs. H.

Hrumph. 

This has no reference to the Mrs. Hubbard I speak of, but I thought it would be nice to reference a dancing, drinking, smoking and laughing dog with a monument promised to him upon his death.

Speaking of which, I have my 10 year service pin now. Ouch. A prick on the finger. No catalogue to choose from though.

Old Mother Hubbard
Went to the cupboard,
To give the poor dog a bone;
When she came there,
The cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog had none.

She went to the baker's
To buy him some bread;
When she came back
The dog was dead!

She went to the undertaker's
To buy him a coffin;
When she came back
The dog was laughing.

She took a clean dish
to get him some tripe;
When she came back
He was smoking his pipe.

She went to the alehouse
To get him some beer;
When she came back
The dog sat in a chair.

She went to the tavern
For white wine and red;
When she came back
The dog stood on his head.

She went to the fruiterer's
To buy him some fruit;
When she came back
He was playing the flute.

She went to the tailor's
To buy him a coat;
When she came back
He was riding a goat.

She went to the hatter's
To buy him a hat;
When she came back
He was feeding her cat.

She went to the barber's
To buy him a wig
When she came back
He was dancing a jig.
 
She went to the cobbler's
To buy him some shoes;
When she came back
He was reading the news.

She went to the sempstress
To buy him some linen;
When she came back
The dog was spinning.
 
She went to the hosier's
To buy him some hose;
When she came back
He was dressed in his clothes.
 
The Dame made a curtsy,
The dog made a bow;
The Dame said, Your servant;
The dog said, Bow-wow.

This wonderful dog
Was Dame Hubbard's delight,
He could read, he could dance,
He could sing, he could write;
She gave him rich dainties
Whenever he fed,
And erected this monument
When he was dead